CE Features

Minari

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" in_content_menu="" text_align="left" css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1613343616547{padding-bottom: 15px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_single_image image="20384" img_size="full" qode_css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1612811281521{background-color: #000000 !important;}"][vc_single_image image="27279" img_size="full" alignment="center" qode_css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1613343838537{background-color: #000000 !important;}"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" in_content_menu="" text_align="left" css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1592682899490{margin-right: 15px !important;background-color: #ffffff !important;}"][vc_column width="2/3" css=".vc_custom_1592679310198{padding-right: 20px !important;}"][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1613343885659{padding-top: 15px !important;}"]Named for a peppery Korean herb, Minari is a tender, funny, evocative ode to how one generation of a family risks everything to plant the dreams of the next. It’s a tale of immigrants making a go at their own vision of the American Dream but director Lee Isaac Chung (Munyurangabo, Lucky Life, Abigail Harm) brings a fresh and illuminating take by using candidly detailed and personal family remembrances to tell a larger story about the impact of the immigrant journey on...

Read More

Mank

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" in_content_menu="" text_align="left" css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1612813321630{padding-bottom: 15px !important;background-color: #000000 !important;}"][vc_column][vc_single_image image="20384" img_size="full" qode_css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1612811281521{background-color: #000000 !important;}"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" in_content_menu="" text_align="left" css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1613348222148{background-color: #000000 !important;}"][vc_column css=".vc_custom_1613348253340{background-color: #000000 !important;}"][vc_single_image image="27318" img_size="full" alignment="center" qode_css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1613348283389{background-color: #000000 !important;}"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" in_content_menu="" text_align="left" css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1592682899490{margin-right: 15px !important;background-color: #ffffff !important;}"][vc_column width="2/3" css=".vc_custom_1592679310198{padding-right: 20px !important;}"][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1613348331639{padding-top: 15px !important;}"]David Fincher’s Netflix drama about screenwriter Herman J. Mankiewicz (Gary Oldman) as he writes and takes a controversial credit as co-writer of Orson Welles’ 1941 classic Citizen Kane is certainly a ‘filmmaker’s film’ with a stellar cast and crew. And in so much as Mank is also a love letter to the Golden Age of Hollywood, it’s exactly the type of fare that Hollywood loves. Based on a screenplay by...

Read More

Wonder Woman 1984

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" in_content_menu="" text_align="left" css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1612813321630{padding-bottom: 15px !important;background-color: #000000 !important;}"][vc_column][vc_single_image image="20384" img_size="full" qode_css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1612811281521{background-color: #000000 !important;}"][vc_single_image image="27325" img_size="full" alignment="center" qode_css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1613348490421{background-color: #000000 !important;}"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" in_content_menu="" text_align="left" css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1592682899490{margin-right: 15px !important;background-color: #ffffff !important;}"][vc_column width="2/3" css=".vc_custom_1592679310198{padding-right: 20px !important;}"][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1613348619598{padding-top: 15px !important;}"]Twenty-two months. That’s how long editor Richard Pearson, ACE, worked on Wonder Woman 1984 – the longest, by many months, he’d ever spent on a single project. “I had seven cutting rooms in locations as varied as Washington, D.C.; the Canary Islands; Soho in London; to the lot at Warner Bros. in Burbank,” he says. Granted, some of that time was living in scheduling limbo on account of the pandemic – the film was slated for release on December 13, 2019,...

Read More

One Night in Miami

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" in_content_menu="" text_align="left" css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1612813321630{padding-bottom: 15px !important;background-color: #000000 !important;}"][vc_column][vc_single_image image="20384" img_size="full" qode_css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1612811281521{background-color: #000000 !important;}"][vc_single_image image="27083" img_size="full" alignment="center" qode_css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1612848583497{background-color: #000000 !important;}"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" in_content_menu="" text_align="left" css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1592682899490{margin-right: 15px !important;background-color: #ffffff !important;}"][vc_column width="2/3" css=".vc_custom_1592679310198{padding-right: 20px !important;}"][vc_column_text]Based on a 2013 play by Kemp Powers, the film offers a fictionalized account of the night of Feb. 25, 1964 when Nation of Islam spokesperson Malcolm X (played by Kingsley BenAdir), NFL football legend Jim Brown (Aldis Hodge) and influential musician and record producer Sam Cooke (Leslie Odom Jr.) gathered together in a Miami hotel room with boxing legend Cassius Clay (Eli Goree) to celebrate his surprise victory over Sonny Liston, and his conversion to Islam as he took on the name...

Read More

Ted Lasso

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" in_content_menu="" text_align="left" css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1592680641916{background-color: #000000 !important;}"][vc_column][vc_single_image image="20384" img_size="full" qode_css_animation=""][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" in_content_menu="" text_align="left" css_animation="" css=".vc_custom_1592682899490{margin-right: 15px !important;background-color: #ffffff !important;}"][vc_column width="2/3" css=".vc_custom_1592679310198{padding-right: 20px !important;}"][vc_single_image image="26525" img_size="full" alignment="center" qode_css_animation=""][vc_column_text]Professional football (soccer) arrived on TVs around the world with the sound of 25,000 Crystal Palace fans singing The Dave Clark Five’s “Glad All Over” when their team wins a home match at Selhurst Park, which doubles as the stadium for Ted Lasso’s fictional U.K. Premier League club, AFC Richmond.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3" css=".vc_custom_1606958556310{margin-top: 30px !important;margin-bottom: 15px !important;border-top-width: 2px !important;border-right-width: 2px !important;border-bottom-width: 2px !important;border-left-width: 2px !important;background-color: #f7f7f7 !important;border-left-color: #000000 !important;border-left-style: solid !important;border-right-color: #000000 !important;border-right-style: solid !important;border-top-color: #000000 !important;border-top-style: solid !important;border-bottom-color: #000000 !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;border-radius: 1px !important;}"][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1607046884727{border-top-width: 1px !important;border-right-width: 1px !important;border-bottom-width: 1px !important;border-left-width:...

Read More